How VR Works

VR headsets like Oculus Rift and PlayStation VR are frequently known as HMDs and all that means is they are head mounted displays. Despite having no sound or hand monitoring, holding up Google Cardboard to place your smartphone’s display before your face can be enough to get you half-immersed in a digital universe.

The aim of the hardware is really to create what seems to be a lifesize, 3D virtual environment without the borders we usually associate with Video or computer displays. So whichever way you look, the display mounted to your face follows you. That is unlike AR which overlays graphics onto your view of the real life.

Video is sent from the console or computer to the headset via a HDMI cable in the instance of headsets such as HTC’s Vive and the Rift. For Google Cardboard, Google’s coming Daydream headsets and the Samsung Gear VR, it’s already on the smartphone slotted into the headset.

VR head sets use possibly two feeds sent to one screen or two LCD screens, one per eye. There are also lenses which are put between your eyes and the picture elements which is why the devices in many cases are called goggles. Sometimes, these can be fixed to fit the distance between your eyes which changes from individual to person.

These lenses concentrate and reshape the graphic for each eye and produce a stereoscopic 3D image by angling the two 2D pictures to mimic how all of our two eyes sees the universe ever-s O-slightly otherwise. Try shutting one eye then the other to see individual things dancing about from side to side and you get the concept behind this.

Head tracking signifies that when you wear a VR headset, the picture before you shifts as you appear up, down and side to side or angle your head. A system called 6DoF (six levels of flexibility) plots your head with regard to your x, y and ZAXIS to measure head movements forward and back, sideways and shoulder to shoulder, otherwise known as pitch, yaw and roll.